Tuesday, December 24, 2013

WHAT VITAMIN D GOT TO DO WITH c-MYC ANYWAY?

Yes it is true that there is a potential link between Calcitriol (the active form of Vitamin D) and  the master genetic amplifier c-MYC, a bad prognosis factor in some cancers such as small cell lung cancers. And  in this type of lung cancers, the expression or activation of c-MYC is one the driving forces.  And it is not the only virulent cancer to borrow the power of c-MYC.

"Amplification and expression of the c-myc oncogene in human lung cancer cell lines
Cameron D. Little, Marion M. Nau, Desmond N. Carney, Adi F. Gazdar & John D. Minna
NCI-Navy Medical Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, and Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Maryland 20814, USA
Genetic changes involving the c-myc oncogene have been observed in human tumours. In particular, the c-myc gene is translocated in Burkitt's lymphoma1–3 and is amplified in the human promyelocytic leukaemia cell line...."
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(If you happen not to find a target for therapy, call CRBCM, immediately!) today VITAMIN D is given at 50,000 IU weekly.
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Calcitriol acts through its receptor, the Calcitriol receptor of course, will eventually interact with a Zinc finger and BTB domain-containing protein 16, encoded by the ZBTB16, a popular gene that will engage events in the epigenetic areas which include many receptors (watch out because even the Angiotensin receptor is engaged).  But ultimately the RUNX and the GATA2 are also engaged. The involvement of SN3A and MDX1 however will have the most importance when it comes to c-MYC since these gene impact the Mad-Max complex.  And you know what c-MYC needs to be active (association with MAX),

let Wikipedia tell you:

MXD1

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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MAX dimerization protein 1

PDB rendering based on 1nlw.
Available structures
PDB Ortholog search: PDBe, RCSB
Identifiers
Symbols MXD1; BHLHC58; MAD; MAD1
External IDs OMIM600021 MGI96908 HomoloGene1767 GeneCards: MXD1 Gene
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE MXD1 206877 at tn.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez 4084 17119
Ensembl ENSG00000059728 ENSMUSG00000001156
UniProt Q05195 Q8K1Z8
RefSeq (mRNA) NM_001202513 NM_010751
RefSeq (protein) NP_001189442 NP_034881
Location (UCSC) Chr 2:
70.12 – 70.17 Mb
Chr 6:
86.65 – 86.67 Mb

PubMed search [1] [2]
MAD protein is a protein that in humans is encoded by the MXD1 gene.[1][2]
MAD-MAX dimerization protein belongs to a subfamily of MAX-interacting proteins. This protein competes with MYC for binding to MAX to form a sequence-specific DNA-binding complex, acts as a transcriptional repressor (while MYC appears to function as an activator) and is a candidate tumor suppressor.[2] The MAD-MAX protein dimer may be a reference to the popular cult classic film Mad Max (1979)."wikipedia

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FOR A CAREFUL PREVENTION PROGRAM USING VITAMIN D, OR ASSOCIATION OF VITAMIN D IN TREATMENTS OF MENTIONED CANCERS, LET'S WORK HARD! (whenever focusing on c-MYC, don't forget the FUSE or FUBP1)
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